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Michael P. Moody, Ph.D., has been named Professor of Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Moody’s decades of research, teaching, writing and speaking have greatly expanded and improved the understanding and practice of philanthropy and nonprofit organizations. He is especially known for bridging scholarship and professional practice in ways that are accessible to diverse audiences yet informed by the latest research.

Young-joo Lee, Ph.D., has been named the Eileen Lamb O’Gara Chair in Women’s Philanthropy and Professor of Philanthropic Studies at the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Lee studies both the underrepresentation of women as leaders at large nonprofit organizations and the overrepresentation of women in the philanthropic sector overall, as well as the representation of women in higher education. She will work closely with the school's Women's Philanthropy Institute.

Two highly esteemed philanthropy scholars—Michael Moody and Young-joo Lee—are joining the Lilly Family School of Philanthropy faculty and a third, Tyrone McKinley Freeman, is advancing to a new role. Freeman has been named Glenn Family Chair in Philanthropy. Lee has been appointed Eileen Lamb O’Gara Chair in Women’s Philanthropy, and public scholar Moody has been appointed Professor of Philanthropic Studies.

Key findings from Giving USA 2023: The Annual Report on Philanthropy for the Year 2022 released today report that individuals, bequests, foundations and corporations gave an estimated $499.33 billion to U.S. charities in 2022. The longest-running and most comprehensive report on the sources and uses of charitable giving in America is published by Giving USA Foundation, a public service initiative of The Giving Institute. It is researched and written by the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy.

A new LGBTQ+ Index and research report released today by the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at IUPUI shows philanthropic support for LGBTQ+ organizations accounted for 0.13% of total U.S. charitable giving in 2019, the latest year for which data are available. The LGBTQ+ Index, made possible through anchor funding from Google.org, is the most comprehensive measure of philanthropic support for LGBTQ+ organizations from individuals, foundations, and corporations in the U.S. and provides a baseline for helping practitioners, policymakers, funders, journalists and scholars better understand giving to this under-resourced group

Today, the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy at IUPUI released the 2023 Global Philanthropy Tracker (GPT), the 11th edition of this unique index that offers a comprehensive picture of the scale and scope of worldwide cross-border philanthropy. The GPT is a critical tool that bridges the gap between the increasing need for philanthropy and the lack of available data insights about the scope of cross-border giving. The report also compares cross-border philanthropy to three other cross-border financial resource flows, including official development assistance (ODA), private capital investment, and remittances. The GPT demonstrates how civil society, government, business, and individuals collaborate to find sustainable solutions for societal issues around the globe.

At a time when there is concern about public confidence in society’s institutions, Americans have a broadly favorable impression of charitable giving and nonprofit organizations, but many know relatively little about how philanthropy functions, its impact on their lives, or how its current controversies could shape the future, a new study from the Indiana University Lilly Family School of Philanthropy finds. The report, What Americans Think About Philanthropy and Nonprofits, examines public awareness, attitudes and perceptions of philanthropy, philanthropic sector institutions, and policies that govern and affect charitable giving.